San Francisco Greenlights Transformation of Dilapidated Public Housing

Historic Votes Pave Way for Related California and Mercy Housing to Create Mixed-Income Housing

San Francisco, CA – The chronically under-serviced and isolated Sunnydale neighborhood is on the cusp of a long-awaited rejuvenation following a San Francisco Board of Supervisors’ vote authorizing the phased redevelopment of the Sunnydale public housing site. The existing 778 public housing units will be replaced in phases with up to 1,700 units of mixed-income housing, ranging from very low to market rate.

Sunnydale’s redevelopment is a community-driven public-private partnership between residents, the City and County of San Francisco, the San Francisco Housing Authority, the Mayor’s Office of Housing and Community Development (MOHCD), and the master developers. Key themes and priorities were discussed at 17 community planning meetings conducted over almost two years and include a safe, secure environment for all residents; support for youth, elders, and families through quality programs, facilities, parks, and neighborhood retail; an end to social and physical isolation from the rest of the neighborhood and city; and green streets, open spaces, and edible landscaping for a healthy community – all of which result in a great place to live and visit. Sunnydale is part of the HOPE SF Neighborhood Transformation Initiative, which is San Francisco’s largest anti-poverty collaborative effort in decades.

Related California and its partner Mercy Housing are one of a series of public/private teams in San Francisco utilizing specialized development expertise to transform public housing. The HOPE SF initiative also includes a similar development in southern Potrero Hill.

“It’s gratifying to be part of the team that is working with the residents of Sunnydale to transform their community,” said Related California CEO William Witte. “This development continues our longstanding commitment to mixed-income housing and the comprehensive master planning process will ensure the creation of a true neighborhood, with services and amenities for all.”

Once complete, Sunnydale will include 1:1 replacement of public housing units, and approximately 1,000 new mixed-income units, as will 3.5 acres of new public open space and play areas, plazas, urban gardens, retail, social services, and community and rec centers.

“From our perspective, partnering with residents to transform Sunnydale is first and foremost an investment in people,” says Doug Shoemaker, President of Mercy Housing California. “On behalf of our partners at Related, we see one of our principal roles as helping the City and residents of Sunnydale educate our children, keep our families safe, and share in the economic prosperity that surrounds Sunnydale.”

Construction at Sunnydale is expected to begin later in 2017, and includes the development of new roads, sidewalks, transit connections, and utilities in what will be an extension of the regular street grid to ensure a seamless connection between the new communities and their surroundings.

ANNOUNCEMENTS
San Francisco Greenlights Transformation of Dilapidated Public Housing

San Francisco Greenlights Transformation of Dilapidated Public Housing

2/7/2017 Historic Votes Pave Way for Related California and Mercy Housing to Create Mixed-Income Housing

San Francisco, CA – The chronically under-serviced and isolated Sunnydale neighborhood is on the cusp of a long-awaited rejuvenation following a San Francisco Board of Supervisors’ vote authorizing the phased redevelopment of the Sunnydale public housing site. The existing 778 public housing units will be replaced in phases with up to 1,700 units of mixed-income housing, ranging from very low to market rate.

Sunnydale’s redevelopment is a community-driven public-private partnership between residents, the City and County of San Francisco, the San Francisco Housing Authority, the Mayor’s Office of Housing and Community Development (MOHCD), and the master developers. Key themes and priorities were discussed at 17 community planning meetings conducted over almost two years and include a safe, secure environment for all residents; support for youth, elders, and families through quality programs, facilities, parks, and neighborhood retail; an end to social and physical isolation from the rest of the neighborhood and city; and green streets, open spaces, and edible landscaping for a healthy community – all of which result in a great place to live and visit. Sunnydale is part of the HOPE SF Neighborhood Transformation Initiative, which is San Francisco’s largest anti-poverty collaborative effort in decades.

Related California and its partner Mercy Housing are one of a series of public/private teams in San Francisco utilizing specialized development expertise to transform public housing. The HOPE SF initiative also includes a similar development in southern Potrero Hill.

“It’s gratifying to be part of the team that is working with the residents of Sunnydale to transform their community,” said Related California CEO William Witte. “This development continues our longstanding commitment to mixed-income housing and the comprehensive master planning process will ensure the creation of a true neighborhood, with services and amenities for all.”

Once complete, Sunnydale will include 1:1 replacement of public housing units, and approximately 1,000 new mixed-income units, as will 3.5 acres of new public open space and play areas, plazas, urban gardens, retail, social services, and community and rec centers.

“From our perspective, partnering with residents to transform Sunnydale is first and foremost an investment in people,” says Doug Shoemaker, President of Mercy Housing California. “On behalf of our partners at Related, we see one of our principal roles as helping the City and residents of Sunnydale educate our children, keep our families safe, and share in the economic prosperity that surrounds Sunnydale.”

Construction at Sunnydale is expected to begin later in 2017, and includes the development of new roads, sidewalks, transit connections, and utilities in what will be an extension of the regular street grid to ensure a seamless connection between the new communities and their surroundings.